The Brew Ran True – PPTQ Tournament Report (Top 4)

As part of GasMTG’s article series profiling the art of brewing, I have been invited to write a report of the recent Modern PPTQ at GUF Werribee. This tournament was the first time I unveiled the new brew I had been working on, which I named [Name redacted].

Of course, I can’t give away too many details about the deck itself. As GasMTG has taken a very strong position against netdecking, there is a chance that if this article is published and the deck goes online, it would, in turn, no longer be a brew and become a net deck.

To avoid that, I have kept some sections deliberately vague.

The decklist!

4

4

3

1

3

2

2

4

1

4

3

4

2

1

23 Land

Card Choices

Obviously, Modern is a very open format, and so to combat this, I wanted to be either as proactive or reactive as possible. The cards I played were chosen for their high raw power level, or their synergy with other cards, depending. I wanted to keep the removal (if there is any) cheap or expensive, to deal with the wide variety of offensive threats in the format, especially high impact two-drops like Goyf and Steel Overseer. The potential addition of a combo element to the deck may have given it an edge that people did or did not see coming.

Sideboarding

I found that I would typically side out 2      and 2      , which suggests that they don’t belong in the main deck. I would probably replace them with 1      from the sideboard, cut a land, and add 1      , 2      and a       . The sideboard was awkwardly built, so I didn’t want to include the full list, but I have used a package of 1      , 2      and a       to transform a little post-board against decks like Jund and UWR.

The Tournament!

Round One vs Blue Tron – win

Round Two vs Jund – loss

Round Three vs Merfolk – win

Round Four vs Blue Tron – win

Round Five vs Burn – win

Quarter Final vs Jund opponent from Round Two – win

Semi Final vs Merfolk – loss

Overall, the deck went 5-2 in matches, a win rate of over 70%, which is much higher than any of the archetypes in aggregate data from MTGO. Even the best Modern decks tend to have a win rate of less than 60%, which means this deck is easily Tier One!

That said, the metagame for this event was not what I expected. I was not sure whether to count Jund as one or two decks in the field, as it was the same player both times, but the maths works out best if it’s counted twice. I was surprised that Affinity and Infect had disappeared from the meta, especially since there is still a lot of talk about them online. You should probably cut the 2      and the      from the sideboard as they’re no longer needed.

Matchup Guide

Vs Jund – an even matchup. They kill your creatures, if you have any, and have discard for your spells, if you have any, but you could be too fast for them, or maybe you go over the top. All of the Jund lists in the field are now sporting Grim Flayer, so the      in the board become more important than the 4      in the main.

Vs Merfolk – also even, although I was lucky to win the first match and misplayed to lose the second when I allowed a      to trade with my      , instead of waiting a turn to      . You might have good tools to handle their early threats, or you might just be supposed to race them.

Vs Blue Tron – strictly unloseable. This is the rare 100% matchup, and with Blue Tron being almost 30% of the metagame, it’s a good time to be playing [Name redacted].

Vs Burn – also an unloseable matchup, although the sample size here is smaller than for the other decks. The life gain you may or may not have in the main, or possibly side, is really important, and you should slowroll your      to play around Eidolon as much as possible.

Conclusion

Whilst it might have fallen short this time, it’s clear that this brew is a great choice going forward. You have some even and some unloseable matchups in the current Modern Meta, and no unfavourable ones. Some people say it’s safer to play with decks from the net, but hopefully this report will encourage you all to play your best brews. Next week the field may be a little different as this event clashed with another PPTQ and an RPTQ, but as most of those players are netdeckers the composition of the field is unlikely to change too much, though a few people might try to play this deck after its recent success.

Good luck, brewsters everywhere!

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Card Name: Birthing Pod Mana Cost: 3 Phyrexian Green Converted Mana Cost: 4 Types: Artifact Card Text: (Phyrexian Green can be paid with either Green or 2 life.) 1 Phyrexian Green, Tap, Sacrifice a creature: Search your library for a creature card with converted mana cost equal to 1 plus the sacrificed creature's converted mana cost, put that card onto the battlefield, then shuffle your library. Activate this ability only any time you could cast a sorcery.